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MCAT Tutoring

The MCAT or the Medical College Admissions Test is a test required to gain acceptance into most medical schools.

The MCAT is composed of 4 sections: Chem/Phys, CARS, Bio/Biochem and Psych/Soc.  Every question is multiple-choice, with 4 choices per question (A, B, C, and D). Your score is determined solely by how many you get right—they don’t subtract points for wrong answers. What this means is that you should never leave an answer blank.

The MCAT is a computer based test and NOT computer adaptive.  All questions in a section are presented at once.  Thus a person can skip around a particular section and go back and review questions they mark for review (apply POOD = Personal Order Of Difficulty). Highlighting is available for passage markup.  Strike out is available for mark out incorrect answer choices (apply POE = Process Of Elimination).

SECTION 1: CHEMICAL AND PHYSICAL FOUNDATIONS OF BIOLOGICAL SYSTEMS:

This section is designed to test introductory-level biology, organic and inorganic chemistry, and physics concepts; test biochemistry concepts at the level taught in many colleges and universities in first-semester biochemistry courses; test molecular biology topics at the level taught in many colleges and universities in introductory biology sequences and first-semester biochemistry courses; test basic research methods and statistics concepts described by many baccalaureate faculty as important to success in introductory science courses; and require you to demonstrate your scientific inquiry and reasoning, research methods, and statistics skills as applied to the natural sciences.

  • General Chemistry (30%)
  • Physics (25%)
  • Biochemistry (25%)
  • Organic Chemistry (15%)
  • Biology (5%)

59 Questions  in 95 Minutes

10 Passage-based sets of questions (4-6 questions each) + 15 Free Standing Questions

SECTION 2: CRITICAL ANALYSIS AND REASONING SKILLS:

This section is designed to test your comprehension, analysis, and reasoning skills by asking you to critically analyze information provided in passages; include content from ethics, philosophy, studies of diverse cultures, population health, and a wide range of social sciences and humanities disciplines; and provide all the information you need to answer questions in the passages and questions themselves.

Reasoning Beyond the Text (40%):

  • Applying or extrapolating ideas from the passage to new contexts
  • Assessing the impact of introducing new factors, information, or conditions to ideas from the passage

Reasoning Within the Text (30%):

  • Integrating different components of the text to increase comprehension

Foundations of Comprehension (30%):

  • Understanding the basic components of the text
  • Inferring meaning from rhetorical devices, word choice, and text structure

SECTION 3: BIOLOGICAL AND BIOCHEMICAL FOUNDATIONS OF LIVING SYSTEMS

This section is designed to test introductory-level biology, organic chemistry, and inorganic chemistry concepts; test biochemistry concepts at the level taught in many colleges and universities in first-semester biochemistry courses; test cellular and molecular biology topics at the level taught in many colleges and universities in introductory biology sequences and first-semester biochemistry courses; test basic research methods and statistics concepts described by many baccalaureate faculty as important to success in introductory science courses; and require you to demonstrate your scientific inquiry and reasoning, research methods, and statistics skills as applied to the natural sciences.

  • Biology (65%)
  • Biochemistry (25%)
  • General Chemistry (5%)
  • Organic Chemistry (5%)

10 Passage-based sets of questions (4-6 questions each) + 15 Free Standing Questions

SECTION 4: PSYCHOLOGICAL, SOCIAL AND BIOLOGICAL FOUNDATIONS OF BEHAVIOR

This section is designed to test psychology, sociology, and biology concepts that provide a solid foundation for learning in medical school about the behavioral and sociocultural determinants of health; test concepts taught at many colleges and universities in first-semester psychology and sociology courses; test biology concepts that relate to mental processes and behavior that are taught at many colleges and universities in introductory biology; test basic research methods and statistics concepts described by many baccalaureate faculty as important to success in introductory science courses; and require you to demonstrate your scientific inquiry and reasoning, research methods, and statistics skills as applied to the social and behavioral sciences.

  • Psychology (65%)
  • Sociology (30%)
  • Biology (5%)

10 Passages (4-6 questions each) + 15 Free Standing Questions